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CGLI Promotes …

Sustainable Development in the Great Lakes Region
CGLI promotes the economic growth and vitality of the region in harmony with its human and natural resources (sustainable development).

Our Members are …

U.S. and Canadian Industry with significant Great Lakes assets
CGLI is a tax-exempt organization that represents the common interests of U.S. and Canadian industrial organizations. CGLI represents companies that have investments, facilities, products, or services in the Great Lakes region.

We focus on …

A Vision for the Great Lakes Region
CGLI envisions a Great Lakes regional business climate that is built on a foundation of sustainable development and is supported by public policies that promote sustainable ecosystems, enhance opportunities for the community, and provide for long-term economic stability.

NOTICE: CGLI Suspended Operations effective December 31, 2018...

CGLI’s Board of Directors has announced that it will suspend operations beginning January 1, 2019 to re-evaluate its mission, strategy, and structure. CGLI’s collaborative approach – with other stakeholders – has contributed to more balanced regional policy, stronger and more representative governance systems, and an improved Great Lakes ecosystem. Governments and stakeholders increasingly view Great Lakes industry as a partner in the regional resource management agenda and now appropriately seek to engage companies directly rather than rely on CGLI as the collective “voice of industry” in binational Great Lakes policy development. Taking a pause now enables CGLI to reevaluate the organization’s mission, strategy, and structure, in the context of the significant progress that has been made.

Economic impact study of GLRI released September 25...

A study coordinated by CGLI with the Great Lakes Commission shows that every federal dollar spent on Great Lakes Restoration Initiative (GLRI) projects from the program’s launch in 2010 through 2016 will produce an additional $3.35 of additional economic activity in the Great Lakes region through 2036. The study – which estimates only some of the GLRI benefits – shows that in certain communities, the longer-term impact will be even greater: every dollar spent in Buffalo and Detroit, for example, will produce more than $4 of additional economic activity. 

Great Lakes Coalition Issues Joint Statement of U.S. Legislative Priorities...

On March 5, a coalition of Great Lakes organizations released a joint statement of U.S. legislative priorities for the Great Lakes region. The statement encourages Congress to fully fund GLRI, maintain base agency budgets for important Great Lakes programs, strengthen conservation programs in the 2018 Farm Bill, boost funding for water infrastructure, strengthen programs that prevent and control invasive species, and maintain and upgrade navigation infrastructure. The legislative priorities will be presented to legislators at Great Lakes Day in Washington, DC on March 7.

Nuclear regulatory agencies recommend against including radionuclides as potential CMC...

Nuclear regulatory agencies in the U.S. and Canada recommend against evaluating radionuclides as potential Chemicals of Mutual Concern under Annex 3 of the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement. Both the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission refute the conclusion that “…there is no level of radionuclides below which exposure can be defined as ‘safe;’ therefore, very low levels of exposure can be significant.” Both agencies state that this claim is incorrect and that it is very difficult to establish the risk of low doses over a lifetime because the risk “is not known with certainty and could be zero.” ECCC and U.S. EPA are considering these recommendations as they prepare to move forward towards reviewing a new set of substances for potential CMC listing later this year.